QuestionQuestion

Chapter 9
Write examples in your own words for each term - 13 terms:
Textbook: "Managing and Using Information Systems: A Strategic Approach”, 6th Edition, by Keri E. Pearlson, Carol S. Saunders, Dennis F. Galletta. Publisher: Wiley, 2015. ISBN: 978-1-119-25521-5.

ARCHETYPE (P. 196)
A PATTERN RESULTING FROM DECISION RIGHTS ALLOCATION
Example:

CENTRALIZED IS ORGANIZATIONS (P.193)
The organization structure that brings together all power, staff, hardware, software, data, and processing into a single location/position.
Example:

COBIT (CONTROL OBJECTIVES FOR INFORMATION AND RELATED TECHNOLOGY) (P.202)
The IT governance framework for decision controls that is consistent with the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO) and that provides systematic rigor needed for the strong internal controls and Sarbanes-Oxley compliance.
Example:

CONSUMERIZATION (P.191)
The drive to port applications to personal devices and the ensuring issues involved in making them work in business organizations.
Example:

DECENTRALIZED IS ORGANIZATIONS (P.193)
The IS organization structure that scatters power, hardware, software, networks, and data components in different locations/positions to address local business needs.
Example:

DIGITAL ECOSYSTEM (P.197)
Regards those systems as self-interested, self-organizing, and autonomous digital entities
Example:

FEDERALISM (P.194)
The organization structuring approach that distributes power, hardware, software, data, and personnel between a central IS group and IS in business units
Example:

GOVERNANCE (P.192)
The established process of making decisions, defining expectations, granting power, or verifying performance.
Example:

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY INFRASTRUCTURE LIBRARY (ITIL) (P.203)
The control framework that offers a set of concepts and techniques for managing information technology infrastructure, development, and operations that was developed in United Kingdom.
Example:

IT GOVERNANCE (P.195)
The established decision rights and accountability framework to encourage desirable behavior in using IT.
Example:

REVIEW BOARD (P.199)
A committee that is formally designated to approve, monitor, and review specific topics related to the IS department and systems.
Example:

SARBANES-OXLEY ACT of 2002 (SoX) (P.200)
The U.S. act to increase regulatory visibility and accountability of public companies and their financial health.
Example:

STEERING COMMITTEE (P.199)
An IT governance mechanism that calls for joint participation of IT and business leaders in making decisions about IT as a group.
Example:

Chapter 10
INFORMATION SYSTEMS SOURCING
Write examples in your own words for each term - 13 terms:
Textbook: "Managing and Using Information Systems: A Strategic Approach”, 6th Edition, by Keri E. Pearlson, Carol S. Saunders, Dennis F. Galletta. Publisher: Wiley, 2015. ISBN: 978-1-119-25521-5.

Backsourcing (p.223)
Example:

Business ecosystem (p.224)
A type of ecosystem that is an economic where organizations and individuals interact.
Example:

Captive center (p.210)
An overseas subsidiary that is set up to serve the parent company. Companies set up captive centers as an alternative to offshoring.
Example:

CLOUD COMPUTING (P.216)
The style of infrastructure for which capacity, applications, and services (such as development, maintenance, or security) are provided dynamically by a third-party provider over the internet, often on a “fee-for-use” basis. Customers go to the Web for the services they need.
Example:

COMMUNITY CLOUD (P.218)
Cloud infrastructure that is shared by several organizations and supports the common concerns of a specific community.
Example:

CROWDSOURCING (P.214)
The act of taking a task traditionally performed by an employee or a contractor and outsourcing it through the form of an open call to an undefined, generally large group of people.
Example:

FARSHORING (P.220)
A form of offshoring that involves sourcing service work to a foreign, low-wage country that is relatively far in distance or time or time zone (or both) from the client company.
Example:

FULL OUTSOURCING (P.215)
The situation in which an enterprise outsources all its IS functions from desktop services to software development.
Example:

HYBRID CLOUD (P.218)
A cloud infrastructure that is a combination of private and public clouds.
Example:

INSOURCING (P.210)
The manner in which a firm provides IS services or develops IS from its own in house IS organization.
Example:

IT MULTISOURCING (P.215)
A type of sourcing in which IT projects and services are allocated to multiple vendors who work together to achieve the client’s business objectives.
Example:

NEARSHORING (P.220)
A form of offshoring service work to a foreign, low-wage country that is relatively close in distance or time zone (or both) to the client company.
Example:

OFFSHORING (outsourcing offshore): (P.219)
The situation in which an IS organization uses contractor services or even builds its own data center in a distant land.
Example:

ONSHORING (inshoring): (P.218)
The situation in which outsourcing work is performed domestically.
Example:

OUTSOURCING (P.211)
The business arrangement in which third-party providers and vendors manage the activities of the information systems. In a typical outsourced arrangement, the company finds vendors to perform operational, support, and systems development activities, saving strategic decisions for the internal information systems personnel.
Example:

PRIVATE CLOUDS (P.218)
A cloud infrastructure in which data are managed by the organization itself.
Example:

PUBLIC CLOUD (P.218)
A cloud infrastructure in which data are stored outside of the corporate data centers in the cloud provider’s environment.
Example:

SELECTIVE OUTSOURCING (P.215)
The action taken when an enterprise chooses which IT capabilities to retain in house and which to give to an outsider.
Example:

SERVICE LEVEL AGREEMENTS (SLA) (P.215)
Portion of the formal service contract between clients and outsourcing providers that describes the level of service including delivery time and expected service performance.
Example:

STRATEGIC NETWORK (P.224)
A different approach to viewing outsourcing arrangements in the strategic network, a long-term, purposeful “arrangement by which companies set up a web of close relationships that form a veritable system geared to providing product or services in a coordinated way.”
Example:

Chapter 13
PRIVACY AND ETHICAL CONSIDERATIONS IN INFORMATION MANAGEMENT
Write examples in your own words for each term - 13 terms:
Textbook: "Managing and Using Information Systems: A Strategic Approach”, 6th Edition, by Keri E. Pearlson, Carol S. Saunders, Dennis F. Galletta. Publisher: Wiley, 2015. ISBN: 978-1-119-25521-5.

ACCESSIBILITY (P.291)
An area of information control involved with the ability to obtain data.
Example:

ACCURACY (P.290)
An area of information control dealing with the correctness of information or lack of errors in information.
Example:

COOKIES (P.287)
A small coded text message placed on or retrieved and updated from a person’s hard drive to allow companies to track the person’s movements through a site or sites.
Example:

GREEN COMPUTING (P.292)
An upcoming technology in which companies become more socially responsible by using computing resources efficiently.
Example:

IDENTITY THEFT (P.291)
The taking of a victim’s identity to obtain credit and/or credit cards from banks and retailers, steal money from the victim’s existing accounts, apply for loans, establish accounts with utility companies, rent an apartment, file for bankruptcy, or obtain a job using the victim’s name.
Example:

INFORMATION ETHICS (P.280)
The ethical issues associated with the development and application of information technologies.
Example:

ONLINE REPUTATION MANAGEMENT (P.287)
The service provided to a person or company for a fee to find negative formal or informal reviews on Web sites and report results to the client periodically.
Example:

PRIVACY (P.285)
The area of information control involved with the right to be left alone; an individual’s ability to personally control information about himself or herself; it is involved with the protections from intrusion and information gathering by others
Example:

PROPERTY (P.290)
An area of information control focused on who owns the data
Example:

SOCIAL CONTRACT THEORY (P.281)
The theory used in business ethics that places responsibility on corporate managers to consider the needs of the society (societies) in which a corporation is embedded. Social contract theorists ask what conditions would have to be met for the members of such a society to agree to allow a corporation to be formed. Thus, society bestows legal recognition on a corporation to allow it to employ social resources toward given ends.
Example:

STAKEHOLDER THEORY (P.281)
A theory used in business ethics that suggests that managers, although bonded by their relation to stockholders, are also entrusted with a fiduciary responsibility to all those who holds a stake in or a claim on the firm, including employees, customers, vendors, neighbors, and so forth.
Example:

STOCKHOLDER THEORY (P.280)
A theory used in business ethics suggesting that stockholders advance capital to corporate managers who act as agents in advancing the stockholders’ ends. The nature of this contract binds managers to act in the interest of the shareholders (i.e., to maximize shareholder value).
Example:

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ARCHETYPE (P. 196)
A PATTERN RESULTING FROM DECISION RIGHTS ALLOCATION
Example:
An archetype is the perfect example, or an idealized model/pattern of an entity such as a person, system, behavior or personality. For instance, IT governance uses typical political archetypes such as monarchy, duopoly, anarchy and so on to describe the patterns used to allocate decision rights to decision makers.

CENTRALIZED IS ORGANIZATIONS (P.193)
The organization structure that brings together all power, staff, hardware, software, data, and processing into a single location/position.
Example:
Refers to an organizational structure where information system elements such as people, computer hardware, software and data are found in one place. For example, an organization where all servers, IT staff and processes are done from a single headquarter, is a centralized IS organization.

COBIT (CONTROL OBJECTIVES FOR INFORMATION AND RELATED TECHNOLOGY) (P.202)
The IT governance framework for decision controls that is consistent with the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO) and that provides systematic rigor needed for the strong internal controls and Sarbanes-Oxley compliance.
Example:
It is an IT governance framework comprising good practices that can be used to guide the development, implementation, monitoring and improvement of Information Systems management and governance practices.

CONSUMERIZATION (P.191)
The drive to port applications to personal devices and the ensuring issues involved in making them work in business organizations.
Example:
Refers to the blending of business and personal uses of technology devices and applications. For example, employees can have powerful business class computers suitable for both home and business use. A good example is computers such as the MacBook Pro which can be used as a powerful business machine, and as a standard home computer.

DECENTRALIZED IS ORGANIZATIONS (P.193)
The IS organization structure that scatters power, hardware, software, networks, and data components in different locations/positions to address local business needs.
Example:
A way of organizing information system elements and resources such as people, devices and applications in different locations to serve local business needs faster. For instance, each branch of a retail store may have its own servers, IT staff, and software to serve its purposes instead of having one headquarters where all control occurs like in centralized IS.

DIGITAL ECOSYSTEM (P.197)
Regards those systems as self-interested, self-organizing, and autonomous digital entities
Example:
Refers to an interdependent group of entities such as people, devices, enterprises and things that share standardized digital platforms with the aim of achieving a mutually beneficial purpose. An example of a digital ecosystem is the Internet of Things (IoT) which brings together technologies such as connected health, connected homes, connected vehicles, mobile computing, the cloud, connected agriculture and so on into a common digital society...

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