QuestionQuestion

Step 1: Go to YouTube and watch "Origin of life" the BBC, hosted by Naturalist David Attenborough
Step 2: While you watch, take notes on evolutionary changes, mass extinctions, and developmental stages required of the first life forms produces you and how natural selection produces evolutionary changes over long periods of time.
Step 3: After the film (58min long), answer the questions below.
Requirements: Provide detail give examples for each and from the film to support your answers. Each answer should be at least 1 paragraph in length. Typed, 10 point font, double spaced.
1. Describe how palaeontologists have been able to use fossil evidence to piece together the history of early life. Where do they find evidence? type
What of material is it? How can we understand what happened millions of years ago?
2. What does the term "snowball earth" refer to? How did it contribute to evolutionary changes? (2 points)
3. What evidence did the fossils found at Mistaken Point prove about the evolution of early life? (2 points)
4. Describe the fossil evidence for the first animals capable of movement, why was this a "better" strategy than a fixed location? (2 points)
5. What fossil evidence has been found that identifies the time when animals used sexual reproduction rather than asexual reproduction, how was this strategy of sexual reproduction beneficial to the animals? (2 points)


Step 1: Go to YouTube and type in "History of the world in two hours" made by the History channel
Step 2: While you watch, take notes on major geologic changes, mass extinctions, and developmental stages of the evolution of life.
Step 3: After the film (1 1/2 hour long), answer the questions below.
Requirements: Provide detail for each and give examples from the film to support your answers. Each answer should be at least 1 paragraph in length. Typed, 10 point font, double spaced.
1. List significant geologic/environmental changes that led to the formation of early life. Describe how these changes made it possible for early life to form. How complex was early life? Where did it likely first develop? (2 points)
2. List significant geologic/environmental changes that led to the formation of human life. Describe how these changes made it possible for privates to develop intelligence. Explain the dietary, physical and developmental changes that allowed some primates to dominate and even leave Africa. (2 points)
3. Explain how mass extinctions shaped the course of evolution. Choose three separate mass extinctions and describe the resulting impact on dominate plants/animals (make sure to discuss the mass extinction that occurred 65 million years ago that shaped mammal evolution). (2 points)
4. How did farming change the development of mankind? (2 points)
5. Completed Notes detailing major geologic changes, mass extinctions, and developmental stages of the evolution of life attached (2 points)

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These solutions may offer step-by-step problem-solving explanations or good writing examples that include modern styles of formatting and construction of bibliographies out of text citations and references. Students may use these solutions for personal skill-building and practice. Unethical use is strictly forbidden.

1.
Paleontologists use fossil evidence of significant organisms and environments to piece together the history of early life. The soft-bodied organisms of early life are recorded in rocks that were originally mud in the ocean. The organisms leave imprints within the soft mud that are later hardened when the mud turn into rock which can be dated with radiometric methods. The rocks of Mistaken point, for example, are unique because the organisms were rapidly buried by volcanic ash so they were well-preserved without decaying first. Paleontologists find this evidence in various parts of the world where rocks of the appropriate age and type are found and exposed, such as Cananda and Australia as seen in the video.
2.
The term “snowball earth” refers to a time hundreds of millions of years ago when the earth was in the largest ice age it has likely experienced. Ice stretched from pole to pole as the seas were frozen over and the continents covered in glaciers for millions of years. Many of the earliest stages of life were not able to survive the conditions. However, the microorganisms that were able to hang on and survive during snowball earth (“extremophiles”), experienced a population explosion once the snowball earth melted and conditions became more favorable. Meltwater from the glaciers carrying lots of ground-up rock and nutrients basically acted as a fertilizer for photosynthesizing organisms in the ocean, which then lead to increased oxygen in the atmosphere. Increased oxygen then allowed for single-celled organisms to clump into multicellular organisms and eventually become proto-animals.
3.
The fossils at Mistaken Point are important because they record how organisms were no longer just unorganized clumps 579 million years ago. These organisms grew into defined, fractal shapes that included fronds and “pizza discs” that were the largest organisms to live at that point. The soft-bodied organisms are exceptionally preserved...

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