QuestionQuestion

Question 1
Multiple Choice, True/False. choose the letter of the best answer.
If an argument is deductively valid, then: (pick one)
a. all its premises must be true
b. it cannot have a false conclusion
C. if it has false premises, then it must also have a false conclusion
d. it is sound, strong, and cogent
e. it is an inductive argument
f. all of the above
g. none of the above

Question 2
If a deductive argument is sound, then: (pick one)
a. it must have a true conclusion
b. it may have a false conclusion
C. it may have a false premise
d. it must be valid
e. both (a) and (d)
f. none of the above

Question 3
Consider the following argument:
P1. If you study hard then you will get an A (grade)
P2. Susan got an A
C3. So, Susan studied hard
a. this argument is valid
b. this argument is invalid
C. this argument is sound
d. both (a) and (c)
e. none of the above

Question 4
If I know that an argument has both true premises and a true conclusion, then I
can at least conclude that the argument is valid. (pick one)
True
False

Question 5
A cogent inductive argument, (pick one)
a. is valid (it is impossible for the premises to be true and the conclusion false)
b. has strength (the premises, if true, would make it rational to believe the conclusion) and false or unacceptable premises
C. always has at least one false premise
d. both (b) and (c)
e. all of the above
f. none of the above

Question 6
As discussed in class and on the ppts, one way not to think rationally about moral or policy questions is by appealing to preferences or feelings. This is not a good way to decide moral or policy questions because: (pick one)
a. it would necessarily lead to invalid argument forms
b. not everyone has the same feelings or preferences and this would lead to conflicts, but solving conflicts is part of what morality and policy debate is about
C. feeling or preferring that something is moral or immoral does not make it so - feeling or preferring that some policy is correct does not make it so
d. both (b) and (c)
e. none of the above

Question 7
Ethical relativists argue that there are several objective and absolute moral principles that hold for everyone regardless of time, place, culture, or religion.
(pick one)
True
False

Question 8
Moral or ethical theory is composed of a theory of value (theory of the good), a theory of obligation (theory of the right), and a theory of moral character. A theory of value is concerned with: (pick one)
a. the source of rights to life, liberty, and property
b. the moral evaluation of people, states of affairs, character traits, etc., as good or bad (or better or worse)
C. what makes and action right or wrong
d. both (a) and (c)
e. none of the above

Question 9
A theory of obligation, or a theory of the right, is concerned with: (pick one)
a. the moral evaluation of actions as right or wrong, obligatory, permissible or forbidden
b. the moral evaluation of people, states of affairs, character traits, etc., as good or bad (or better or worse)
C. what makes a person morally virtuous
d. the selfish motives of an action
e. none of the above

Question 10
Hedonism is: (pick one)
a.a theory of value that says only pleasure is good (valuable) and only pain is bad (disvaluable)
b. a unit of pleasure
C. a theory about what God commands
e. a theory of moral obligation that holds we should each maximize the happiness of others
f. none of the above

Question 11
What is ethical relativism? What does this theory say about moral obligations? Next, present and explain two objections to ethical relativism.

Question 12
Explain the Euthyphro objection to Divine Command Theories of Ethics. How does the question that Socrates asks undermine the dependency thesis?

Question 13
Explain these two distinctions. 1) The moral evaluation of an action and the moral evaluation of interference with that action. 2) The moral evaluation of an action and the moral evaluation of the agent who performs it.

Question 14
What is ethical altruism? Explain how it differs from ethical egoism.

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These solutions may offer step-by-step problem-solving explanations or good writing examples that include modern styles of formatting and construction of bibliographies out of text citations and references. Students may use these solutions for personal skill-building and practice. Unethical use is strictly forbidden.

1. If an argument is deductively valid, then: g. none of the above
2. If a ded. arg is sound, then: e. both (a) and (d)
3. Consider the...

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