QuestionQuestion

# Data

As with previous homework, all the numeric values you need, other than `0.05`, `0`, `1`, `2` and `3` are defined below:

```{r}
Year=c(1936, 1946, 1951, 1963, 1975, 1997, 2006)
CaloriesPerRecipeMean <- c(2123.8, 2122.3, 2089.9, 2250.0, 2234.2, 2249.6, 3051.9)
CaloriesPerRecipeSD <- c(1050.0, 1002.3, 1009.6, 1078.6, 1089.2, 1094.8, 1496.2)
CaloriesPerServingMean <- c(268.1, 271.1, 280.9, 294.7, 285.6, 288.6, 384.4)
CaloriesPerServingSD <- c(124.8, 124.2, 116.2, 117.7, 118.3, 122.0, 168.3)
ServingsPerRecipeMean <- c(12.9, 12.9, 13.0, 12.7, 12.4, 12.4, 12.7)
ServingsPerRecipeSD <- c(13.3, 13.3, 14.5, 14.6, 14.3, 14.3, 13.0)
sample.size <- 18
tenth.increment <- 0.10
idx.1936 <- 1
idx.2006 <- length(CaloriesPerRecipeMean)
idxs36_07 <- c(idx.1936,idx.2006)
alpha=0.05

CookingTooMuch.dat <- data.frame(
Year=Year,
CaloriesPerRecipeMean = CaloriesPerRecipeMean,
CaloriesPerRecipeSD = CaloriesPerRecipeSD,
CaloriesPerServingMean = CaloriesPerServingMean,
CaloriesPerServingSD = CaloriesPerServingSD,
ServingsPerRecipeMean = ServingsPerRecipeMean,
ServingsPerRecipeSD = ServingsPerRecipeSD
)
```
Similar restrictions from Homework 4,5 and 6 apply. In this homework we will be manipulating data, so you should not need to call the `data.frame` function directly except in the initial steps for Exercise 1 using R; in SAS you can use DATA steps as necessary, although some exercises may be easier using PROC SQL.

# Exercise 1.
Recreate the table from Exercise 1, Homework 6 but start with the table from Exercise 1, Homework 5. Specifically, you will start with a data table with 49 rows, but reduce it to 21 rows with a series of manipulations.

## Part a.

Reproduce the code from Homework 5 here. This table should have $7 \times 7$ rows. Call this table 'CohenA` and print the table.

## Part b.

Create a table `CohenB` from `CohenA` by selecting only those rows where `Year1` is not equal to `Year2`; alternatively, select only those rows when Cohen $d$ is greater than 0.

Print this table.

## Part c

*This step is dependent on knowing that the original matrices from Homework 3 were symmetric and have unique values for each pair of treatment differences*

Sort `CohenB` by $d$ values. This will produce a table where there are pairs of rows, each representing the same mean comparison (that is, $|m_{1936} - m_{1946}|$ and $|m_{1946} - m_{1936}|$ will be consecutive rows). Remove one row from each pair by creating an index that will select every other row (i.e. all even number, all odd numbers, alternating true and false). If you do this in SAS, you can reference the automatic variable `_n_` in the DATA step - this variable counts the current row number.

Call this table `CohenC` and print this table.

## Part d.
Sort `CohenC` by `Year1` and `Year2` to reproduce the order of rows in the table from Homework 6. Print this table.

# Exercise 2

### Background
I'm working on software that produces a repeated measures analysis. To test my code, I use published data and compare results. For one analysis, I used data from **Contemporary Statistical Models for the Plant and Soil Sciences**, Oliver Schabenberger and Francis J. Pierce, 2001. These data are measurements of the diameter of individual apples from selected apple trees.

## Part a.
Download the AppleData.csv if you choose R; the SAS data is included in the SAS template. Note these files include comments for the data; you may need to specify comment character in import. (The SAS data was where I started).

To simplify this exercise, create a subset of the AppleData including only trees number 3, 7 and 10. (I was going to edit the files to only include these trees, but then I thought, "That's what computers are for!")

## Part b.

Reshape or transpose this data from the long form to the wide form. Call this data `AppleWide`. This table should have one column for `Tree`, one column for `Apple` and six columns, `diam.1` - `diam.6`. The values in the time columns come from `diam` in `AppleData`. If you use SAS, use `diam1`-`diam6` as column names.

## Part c.

To confirm that you've reshaped correctly, print column means for the wide data set and use an aggregate or apply function to compute `time` means for the long format. If SAS, use PROC MEANS. Call with `var diam; by time;` for one table, and `var diam1-diam6;` for the other.

## Part d.
I choose this example for a test case because it shows a case where the best repeated measures model is an autoregressive model - each measure is correlated with the preceding measure. We can estimate the degree of using the following R code. You don't need to evaluate this code for this exercise; it's provided as a motivation for reshaping the data.

```{r, eval=FALSE}
mult.lm <- lm(cbind(diam.1, diam.2, diam.3, diam.4, diam.5, diam.6) ~ tree, data=AppleWide)
mult.manova <- manova(mult.lm)
print(cov2cor(estVar(mult.lm)))
```

If you use SAS, the equivalent code is part of the PROC GLM block, look for the table title **Partial Correlation Coefficients from the Error SSCP Matrix / Prob > |r|**.

# Exercise 3

This is an exercise in computing the Wilcoxon Signed Rank test. We will be using an example from NIST (`NATR332.DAT`, under https://www.itl.nist.gov/div898/software/dataplot/datasets.htm ). See https://www.itl.nist.gov/div898/software/dataplot/refman1/auxillar/signrank.htm for a reference.

The data are provided:
```{r}
NATR332.DAT <- data.frame(
Y1 = c(146,141,135,142,140,143,138,137,142,136),
Y2 = c(141,143,139,139,140,141,138,140,142,138)
)
```
## Part a.

Add the column `Difference` by subtracting `Y1` from `Y2`. For further analysis, exclude any rows where the difference is 0.

## Part b.

Next add the column `Rank` as the rank of the absolute value of `Difference`.

## Part c.

Add the column `SignedRank` by applying the sign (+ or -) of `Difference`, to to `Rank` (that is, if `Difference` is < 0, then `SignedRank` is -`Rank`, otherwise `SignedRank` is `Rank`).

## Part d.
Compute the sum of the positive ranks, and the absolute value of the sum of the negative ranks.

Let $W$ be the minimum of these two sums. Print $W$.

The expected mean of $W$ is calculated by $\mu_W = N_r*(N_r+1)/4$ with a standard deviation of

$$
\sigma_W = \sqrt{\frac{N_r(N_r+1)(2N_r+1)}{24}}
$$

where $N_r$ is the number of ranked values (excluding differences of 0).
Calculate a $z$ score by

$$z = (\mu_W - W)/\sigma_W$$

and the probability of greater $z$. Print both $z$ and $p$.

The NIST page gives a p-value, 0.5677, based on the continuity correction. We are not computing this correction. You can compare the $p$ of your $z$ in R by

```{r}
wilcox.test(NATR332.DAT$Y1, NATR332.DAT$Y2, paired = TRUE, correct = FALSE, alternative = "greater")
```
# Exercise 4

## Part a

Go to http://www.itl.nist.gov/div898/strd/anova/AtmWtAg.html and download the file listed under `Data File in Table Format` (ttps://www.itl.nist.gov/div898/strd/anova/AtmWtAgt.dat). You may have done this in the previous homework. This file is in the wide format; you will be expected to reshape or transpose this to the long format.

Do not read the file listed under `Data File in Two-Column Format`. This data file is in the long format. You can use it to check your work, but for this exercise you might write code to obtain data in the long form.

## Part b

Reshape or tranpose this table from the wide format to the long format. Make sure the resulting table has two columns - `AgWt` and `Instrument`. Name this table `AtmWtAg.long` and print this table. If you choose SAS, you may need to a row number as ID - you might use the automatic variable `_n_` in the DATA step; use the table name `AtmWtAgLong`.

## Part c

To confirm that the table was reshaped correctly, use aggregate or tapply to calculate means from the long table and use apply or colMeans to calculate means from the wide table. Print and compare the results. If you choose SAS, see the instructions for Exercise 2, Part c.

## Part d.

Convert the `Instrument` column in the long data set to a factor, then set eval=TRUE in the code chunk below. Compare the intercept to the mean of instrument 1, and the slope to the different between the two means. Use the PROC GLM block for SAS.

```{r,eval=FALSE}
AtmWtAg.long$Instrument <- as.factor(AtmWtAg.long$Instrument)
summary(lm(AgWt ~ Instrument,data=AtmWtAg.long))
```

Solution PreviewSolution Preview

These solutions may offer step-by-step problem-solving explanations or good writing examples that include modern styles of formatting and construction of bibliographies out of text citations and references. Students may use these solutions for personal skill-building and practice. Unethical use is strictly forbidden.

# Exercise 1.
Recreate the table from Exercise 1, Homework 6 but start with the table from Exercise 1, Homework 5. Specifically, you will start with a data table with 49 rows, but reduce it to 21 rows with a series of manipulations.

## Part a.

Reproduce the code from Homework 5 here. This table should have $7 \times 7$ rows. Call this table 'CohenA` and print the table.

```{r}
k=length(CaloriesPerRecipeMean)
M= t(CaloriesPerRecipeMean)
M_1 = M[rep(1,k),]
M_2 = t(M_1)
M_1.dat <- data.frame(M_1)
#M_1.dat
CookingTooMuch1.dat <- data.frame(
Year1=Year,
Year2=Year[idx.1936],
CaloriesPerRecipeMean1 = CaloriesPerRecipeMean,
CaloriesPerRecipeMean2 = CaloriesPerRecipeMean[idx.1936],
CaloriesPerRecipeSD1 = CaloriesPerRecipeSD,
CaloriesPerRecipeSD2 = CaloriesPerRecipeSD[idx.1936]
)
#CookingTooMuch1.dat
CookingTooMuch2.dat <- data.frame(
Year1=Year,
Year2=Year[idx.1936+1],
CaloriesPerRecipeMean1 = CaloriesPerRecipeMean,
CaloriesPerRecipeMean2 = CaloriesPerRecipeMean[idx.1936+1],
CaloriesPerRecipeSD1 = CaloriesPerRecipeSD,
CaloriesPerRecipeSD2 = CaloriesPerRecipeSD[idx.1936+1]
)
#CookingTooMuch2.dat
CookingTooMuch3.dat <- data.frame(
Year1=Year,
Year2=Year[idx.1936+2],
CaloriesPerRecipeMean1 = CaloriesPerRecipeMean,
CaloriesPerRecipeMean2 = CaloriesPerRecipeMean[idx.1936+2],
CaloriesPerRecipeSD1 = CaloriesPerRecipeSD,
CaloriesPerRecipeSD2 = CaloriesPerRecipeSD[idx.1936+2]
)
#CookingTooMuch3.dat
CookingTooMuch4.dat <- data.frame(
Year1=Year,
Year2=Year[idx.2006-3],
CaloriesPerRecipeMean1 = CaloriesPerRecipeMean,
CaloriesPerRecipeMean2 = CaloriesPerRecipeMean[idx.2006-3],
CaloriesPerRecipeSD1 = CaloriesPerRecipeSD,
CaloriesPerRecipeSD2 = CaloriesPerRecipeSD[idx.2006-3]
)
#CookingTooMuch4.dat
CookingTooMuch5.dat <- data.frame(
Year1=Year,
Year2=Year[idx.2006-2],
CaloriesPerRecipeMean1 = CaloriesPerRecipeMean,
CaloriesPerRecipeMean2 = CaloriesPerRecipeMean[idx.2006-2],
CaloriesPerRecipeSD1 = CaloriesPerRecipeSD,
CaloriesPerRecipeSD2 = CaloriesPerRecipeSD[idx.2006-2]
)
#CookingTooMuch5.dat
CookingTooMuch6.dat <- data.frame(
Year1=Year,
Year2=Year[idx.2006-1],
CaloriesPerRecipeMean1 = CaloriesPerRecipeMean,
CaloriesPerRecipeMean2 = CaloriesPerRecipeMean[idx.2006-1],
CaloriesPerRecipeSD1 = CaloriesPerRecipeSD,
CaloriesPerRecipeSD2 = CaloriesPerRecipeSD[idx.2006-1]
)
#CookingTooMuch6.dat
CookingTooMuch7.dat <- data.frame(
Year1=Year,
Year2=Year[idx.2006],
CaloriesPerRecipeMean1 = CaloriesPerRecipeMean,
CaloriesPerRecipeMean2 = CaloriesPerRecipeMean[idx.2006],
CaloriesPerRecipeSD1 = CaloriesPerRecipeSD,
CaloriesPerRecipeSD2 = CaloriesPerRecipeSD[idx.2006]
)...

By purchasing this solution you'll be able to access the following files:
Solution1.rmd and Solution2.pdf.

50% discount

Hours
Minutes
Seconds
$30.00 $15.00
for this solution

PayPal, G Pay, ApplePay, Amazon Pay, and all major credit cards accepted.

Find A Tutor

View available Statistics-R Programming Tutors

Get College Homework Help.

Are you sure you don't want to upload any files?

Fast tutor response requires as much info as possible.

Decision:
Upload a file
Continue without uploading

SUBMIT YOUR HOMEWORK
We couldn't find that subject.
Please select the best match from the list below.

We'll send you an email right away. If it's not in your inbox, check your spam folder.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
Live Chats