QuestionQuestion

The following is a summary of things to know when creating an APA annotated bibliography:
• The annotated bibliography consists of two elements
o Citation in current APA format
o Annotation
• The annotation will follow the citation on the next line. There is not an extra space—double spacing is used throughout.
• An annotation is different from an abstract. It should have several sentences
summarizing the main points or ideas found in the item. It should then include your own statement evaluating the quality of the item and/or relating the item to your own research topic.
• For a longer annotated bibliography, it is appropriate to divide into sections or topics, and to title those sections as seems fitting.
For each source, the student provides an IWG citation followed by no more than three sentences describing the general information in that source and a few sentences of how the information in that source will fit into the literature review.
Sources:
- Babatunde, O. T., Outlaw, K. R., Forbes, B., & Gay, T. (2014). Revisiting baby boomers and alcohol use: Emerging treatment trends. Journal of Human Behavior in the Social Environment, 24(5), 597-611. doi: 10.1080/10911359.2014.914830
- Barnes, A. J., Xu, H., Tseng, C. H., Ang, A., Tallen, L., Moore, A. A., ... & Ettner, S. L. (2016). The Effect of a Patient-Provider Educational Intervention to Reduce At-Risk Drinking on Changes in Health and Health-Related Quality of Life Among Older Adults: The Project SHARE Study. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 60, 14-20. doi: 10.1016/j.jsat.2015.06.019
- Bosque-Prous, M., Espelt, A., Sordo, L., Guitart, A. M., Brugal, M. T., & Bravo, M. J. (2015). Job loss, unemployment and the incidence of hazardous drinking during the late 2000s recession in Europe among adults aged 50–64 years. PloS One, 10(10), e0140017. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0140017
- Britton, A., & Bell, S. (2015). Reasons why people change their alcohol consumption in later life: findings from the Whitehall II cohort study. PloS One, 10(3), e0119421. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0119421
- Canham, S. L., Mauro, P. M., Kaufmann, C. N., & Sixsmith, A. (2016). Association of alcohol use and loneliness frequency among middle-aged and older adult drinkers. Journal of Aging and Health, 28(2), 267-284. doi: 10.1177/0898264315589579
- Cho, J., Bhimani, J., Patel, M., & Thomas, M. N. (2018). Substance abuse among older adults: A growing problem: Maintaining vigilance is the key to effective recognition and treatment. Current Psychiatry, 17(3), 14-21.
- Cleary, M., Sayers, J., Bramble, M., Jackson, D., & Lopez, V. (2017). Overview of substance use and mental health among the “baby boomers” generation. Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 38(1), 61-65. doi: 10.1080/01612840.2016.1243177
- Emiliussen, J., Nielsen, A. S., & Andersen, K. (2017). Identifying risk factors for late-onset (50+) alcohol use disorder and heavy drinking: a systematic review. Substance Use & Misuse, 52(12), 1575-1588. doi: 10.1080/10826084.2017.1293102
- Haighton, C. (2016). Thinking behind alcohol consumption in old Age: Psychological and sociological reasons for drinking in old age. In A. Kuerbis, A. A. Moore, P. Sacco & F, Zanjani (Eds.), Alcohol and aging: Clinical and public health perspectives (pp. 3-16). New York, NY: Springer.
- Iparraguirre, J. (2015). Socioeconomic determinants of risk of harmful alcohol drinking among people aged 50 or over in England. BMJ Open, 5(7), e007684. doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2015-007684
- Keman, H. (2014). Comparative research methods. In D. Caramani (Ed.), Comparative Politics (pp. 47-59). Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
- Lal, R., & Pattanayak, R. D. (2017). Alcohol use among the elderly: Issues and considerations. Journal of Geriatric Mental Health, 4(1), 4-10. doi: 10.4103/jgmh.jgmh_34_16
- Mackenzie, C. S., El-Gabalawy, R., Chou, K. L., & Sareen, J. (2014). Prevalence and predictors of persistent versus remitting mood, anxiety, and substance disorders in a national sample of older adults. The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 22(9), 854-865. doi: 10.1016/j.jagp.2013.02.007
- Manzon, M. (2014). Comparing places. In M. Bray, B. Adamson & M. Mason (Eds.), Comparative education research: Approaches and methods (pp. 97-138). New York, NY: Springer.
- Marx, A., Rihoux, B., & Ragin, C. (2014). The origins, development, and application of Qualitative Comparative Analysis: the first 25 years. European Political Science Review, 6(1), 115-142. doi: 10.1017/S1755773912000318
- Pillemer, K., Burnes, D., Riffin, C., & Lachs, M. S. (2016). Elder abuse: global situation, risk factors, and prevention strategies. The Gerontologist, 56(Suppl_2), S194-S205. doi:10.1093/geront/gnw004
- Ragin, C. C. (2014). The comparative method: Moving beyond qualitative and quantitative strategies. Oakland, CA: University of California Press.
- Rao, R., Schofield, P., & Ashworth, M. (2015). Alcohol use, socioeconomic deprivation, and ethnicity in older people. BMJ Open, 5(8), e007525. doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2014-007525
- Reale, E. (2014). Challenges in higher education research: The use of quantitative tools in comparative analyses. Higher Education, 67(4), 409-422. doi: 10.1007/s10734-013-9680-2
- Van den Berg, J. F., Kok, R. M., van Marwijk, H. W., van der Mast, R. C., Naarding, P., Voshaar, R. C. O., ... & Comijs, H. C. (2014). Correlates of alcohol abstinence and at-risk alcohol consumption in older adults with depression: the NESDO study. The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 22(9), 866-874. doi: 10.1016/j.jagp.2013.04.006

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Babatunde, O. T., Outlaw, K. R., Forbes, B., & Gay, T. (2014). Revisiting baby boomers and alcohol use: Emerging treatment trends. Journal of Human Behavior in the Social Environment, 24(5), 597-611. doi: 10.1080/10911359.2014.914830
This article focuses on alcohol use among the Baby Boomers, who are the majority in the elderly population. The authors review multiple aspects of alcohol use, including diagnosis, risk factors, and treatment options for the population. The focus on the Baby Boom cohort and the relationship between the population and alcohol use behaviors, the article presents crucial data that can be utilized to understand the impacts of lifestyle behaviors and perceptions on alcohol use. The article examines the baby boom generation and its predisposition to alcohol and substance abuse including early exposure and growing in a culture that embraces substance abuse and alcohol use.
Barnes, A. J., Xu, H., Tseng, C. H., Ang, A., Tallen, L., Moore, A. A., ... & Ettner, S. L. (2016). The Effect of a Patient-Provider Educational Intervention to Reduce At-Risk Drinking on Changes in Health and Health-Related Quality of Life Among Older Adults: The Project SHARE Study. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 60, 14-20. doi: 10.1016/j.jsat.2015.06.019
The article tests the effectiveness of an educational intervention to reduce the risks of alcohol and substance abuse among the elderly. The randomized controlled study focuses on assessing at-risk elderly patients based on comorbid factors of alcohol and substance abuse, drinking problems, and the amount of alcohol already consumed (in terms of quantity and frequency). The randomization of patients to alcohol and substance use counseling by health practitioners or a control group shows positive results of quitting in the intervention than the control. The article highlights the importance of early intervention and the identification of risk factors in the elderly to avert risks of alcohol and substance abuse. It will be essential for making prevention recommendations in the current study.
Bosque-Prous, M., Espelt, A., Sordo, L., Guitart, A. M., Brugal, M. T., & Bravo, M. J. (2015). Job loss, unemployment and the incidence of hazardous drinking during the late 2000s recession in Europe among adults aged 50–64 years. PloS One, 10(10), e0140017. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0140017
The article investigates the impact on the European recession of the late 2000s and susceptibility of the elderly to hazardous drinking. The longitudinal study found the recession to have increased risks of hazardous drinking because of job loss and self-perceived poor health. Similarly, an increase in household disposable income was also associated with risks of hazardous drinking. The article presents a correlation between socioeconomic factors of the elderly and the risks of alcohol consumption. The article will be crucial in the current study because it will...

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