QuestionQuestion

1. Now that we have covered several various theories of psychotherapy and their applications within psychotherapy practice, which ones have you found the most interesting and seemingly useful for helping clients (please name at least two)?

2. What specific aspects of these theories and their applications/ techniques do you feel would be the most effective in evoking change within individuals and why specifically? Also, what kind of client would this approach be most effective with?

3. Of these theories (discussed in the previous two numbers) what are the limitations of these theories in terms of the specific populations they may not be as appropriate for and/or do you see any lack of multicultural inclusivity within these theories/ applications?

4. Did you find issue/flaws with any of the other theories that we have covered (other than the theories you have already discussed)? Did any of the theories/ practical applications of theories seem like they could potentially cause more harm than good for a client?

5. Do you feel that it is possible for an integrative therapist to incorporate every single one of the theories that we have covered into their practice? Which specific theories/techniques might be the most opposite of other theories/techniques and therefore more challenging to integrate? Why do you think it best fit? Please include some psychotherapist as well for this question.

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1. Now that we have covered several various theories of psychotherapy and their applications within psychotherapy practice, which ones have you found the most interesting and seemingly useful for helping clients (please name at least two)?

For me, behavioural and cognitive theories of psychotherapy are the most useful for helping clients.

The main reason I select these two theories is because they do not assume there is something 'wrong' with the client. Both of them simply aim to modify either the client's behaviour or an (irrational) belief systems.

Of both these theories I feel behavioral therapy is a lot more effective, but a lot more controversial as well. Of course the core of behavioral therapy lies in getting the client to change his or her behaviour through classical conditioning (like in aversive therapy to help people quit addiction) or operant conditioning (rewarding/punishing specific behaviors to encourage or discourage them). This can be difficult for some people to accept as it also means accepting that human beings are 'simple' enough to be changed by such basic strategies.

I feel cognitive therapies harness the best of behavioral therapies and add a human component to it, which is why they are maybe even more effective. Cognitive therapies put the ability to change and to improve in the hands of the client by pushing him or her to understand why his/her beliefs are irrational. I feel there's no better way to lead someone to change than by giving them the control over their own lives that they may not have realised they had....
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