Question

What are the answers to the following questions on Confucius and Lao Tzu?

1. Confucius was once asked if there was one rule that could serve as the guide to life.
He replied: "What you do not want done to yourself, do not do to others."
How does this rule compare with the teaching of Jesus on the Golden Rule (Matthew 7:12; Matthew 5:21-26, 43-48).
Is there one rule that you live by?

2. The ideas of the Tao Te Ching (Daodejing) have been widely translated into English.
Some might recall the delightful children’s version of The Tao of Poo and The Te of Piglet.
Consider this saying: "The best man is like water. Water is good; it benefits all things and does not compete with them. It dwells in places that all disdain...The best man in his dwelling loves the earth..."
What does this mean to you?
Do you agree with this philosophy?
Can you see any connection between Taoism and the environmental movement?

Solution Preview

This material may consist of step-by-step explanations on how to solve a problem or examples of proper writing, including the use of citations, references, bibliographies, and formatting. This material is made available for the sole purpose of studying and learning - misuse is strictly forbidden.

#1. Confucius was once asked if there was one rule that could serve as the guide to one's whole life. He replied: "What you do not want done to yourself, do not do to others." How does this rule compare with Jesus' teaching on the Golden Rule? Look at these Biblical verses to see if you can tell the difference: Matthew 7:12; Matthew 5:21-26, 43-48. Is there one rule that you live by?

Jesus’ advice is a call to action to “do to others” what you would have them do to you. (Mt 7:12). It is a positive call to action -- a person should act in such a way that he would himself would want to be treated. In Confucius’s version it is a negative admonition. What I do not want done to me I should not do to others. For Jesus it is positive in that we must “do” whereas for Confucius it is negative in that we must “not do.” It is like the same battery, but both philosophers are represented by two different ends....

This is only a preview of the solution. Please use the purchase button to see the entire solution

Assisting Tutor

Related Homework Solutions

Get help from a qualified tutor
Live Chats