QuestionQuestion

Six-to eight-page paper that gives a basic idea of what the Cold War was, explains one of the proxy wars of the Cold War, and defines realist and idealist theoretic worldviews to explain the proxy war. The paper will also discuss the reasons the Soviet Union fell in 1991, explain the chaos that resulted from the collapse, and use realist or idealist theoretical worldviews to support the explanation. Further, the paper will describe how the Cold War and the collapse of the Soviet Union have impacted (and continue to overshadow) current politics. You will examine the similarities, if any, between the Cold War and the current War on Terror. Finally, you will draw conclusions about the scope and practice of international relations based on your research by explaining the theoretical and practical foundations you have acquired.

Specifically, the following critical elements must be addressed:
I. Defining the Cold War
a. Define the political tension that exists among nations during a “cold war.”
b. Describe the conflict that developed between the United States and the Soviet Union after World War II.

II. Cold War Proxy
a. Identify a proxy of the Cold War and describe the events of that war.
b. Explain how this is a proxy war for the Cold War between the United States and Russia.
c. Use realist or idealist theoretical worldviews to explain the proxy war.

III. The Collapse of the Soviet Union
a. Explain the collapse of the Soviet Union.
b. Explain the chaos that resulted from the collapse of the Soviet Union.
c. Use realist or idealist theoretic worldviews to support the explanation.

IV. Impact: Explain the impact on theorists and practitioners of international relations
a. Describe the dilemmas faced by international political relations scholars at that time as a result of the collapse of the international political system.
b. How did this impact foreign policy at the time?
c. What is the impact on current U.S. foreign policy?
d. Are there similarities between the Cold War and the War on Terror? If so, what are they?

V. Conclusions
a. Describe the impact of history on current political events.
b. Describe the scope and practice of international relations.
c. Explain the theoretical foundations you have acquired.
d. Explain the practical foundations you have acquired.

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I. Defining the Cold War
The cold war can, in simplest terms, be defined as a phenomenon of the second half of the 20th century. If one would to go into depth, the conflict could be described as an unarmed war between the East and the West, more precisely between the Capitalist and Communist regimes that dominate either of the two sides. However, the problem of Cold War is far more complex and structured than it is normally perceived. This paper will try to analyze some of the more salient aspects of this phenomenon as well as the most defining side effects it has had on the world. Additionally, the paper will, in very broad lines, summarize the effects of the fall of the Soviet Union, because this relates directly to the modern geopolitical situation (Craig & Logevall, 2012; Leffler & Painter, 2005).

There is and probably never will be, an unified historical theory of the Cold War that would allow a universal statement and consolidation of views about this part of human history. This is why every question regarding the Cold War has a multitude of different answers, theories and explanations. In the broadest of terms, it could be said that the Cold War started immediately after the end of World War II, that the most obvious reason for its appearance lies in the unnatural division of Germany into two blocks and that it is characterized as a bipolar model of international relationships. Main element of this model is constant state of flux, with no permanent peace, but no actual conflict (Craig & Logevall, 2012; Leffler & Painter, 2005).
Cold War was a time of open animosity and struggle between two competitors, who fought over everything – politics, economy, power and way of life. It is also an undeniable fact that the two major actors of this war were the United States and the Soviet Union as the foremost representatives of their respective models of government. However, even this analysis has to be taken with a pinch of salt, because there were divisions within each confronting block –there were antagonizing elements within communism (between the Soviet Union and Former Yugoslavia) and capitalism (French secession from the NATO in 1966 is a glaring example) - which makes it increasingly difficult to define the Cold War without any omissions (Craig & Logevall, 2012; Leffler & Painter, 2005)....
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