Subject Government and Politics United States Government and Politics

Question

American Revolution
1) What was the purpose of the Declaration of Independence?

First Amendment
2) How has the Supreme Court defined freedom of speech? What are the three categories of free speech? Define each category.
3) What are the five freedoms listed in the First Amendment? The Establishment Clause and the Free Exercise Clause refer to which freedom in the First Amendment? Define each clause.

Second Amendment
4) In the video Bowling for Columbine, Michael Moore suggests that the United States is a violent country. Why does Moore believe that United States is so violent? And finally, what argument(s) could you make to a pro-gun advocate about restricting the availability of guns in the United States based on Moore’s movie?

Article I
5) How old does one have to be to serve in the United States Senate? How many senators are elected from each state? How long is a senator’s term of office? Who is the President of the Senate?
6) Under the Constitution, Native Americans are dual citizens of the United States and of their tribe. What is the justification for this?
7) At the time the United States Constitution was written, what did the phrase “We the People” mean? In other words, to whom did it refer? Who was excluded?

Article II
8) What is the biggest problem with the Electoral College?
9) What did Alexander Hamilton think with regard to “term of office,” for the President of the United States? What did George Washington believe? How many terms can a president serve in office? Which President served the most terms?

Article III
10) What qualifications does one need to be appointed to the Supreme Court?
11) Justices Scalia and Thomas are viewed as strict constructionists of the Constitution. If the constitution is to be viewed this way, can you see a contradiction in their philosophy?
12) Who the court’s first Chief Justice? Who was the first woman appointed to the Court?

Fourth Amendment
13) As you know from your readings, a warrant is not always necessary to conduct a search. List the instances where a warrant would not be necessary.
14) Can an individual be stopped based solely their race or ethnicity? If so, cite the name of the case. Explain.
15) What is the exclusionary rule? How does it work? Are there exceptions to the rule?
16) Why does the Court make a distinction between inside a person’s home and outside a person’s home with regard to the Fourth Amendment?”

Solution Preview

This material may consist of step-by-step explanations on how to solve a problem or examples of proper writing, including the use of citations, references, bibliographies, and formatting. This material is made available for the sole purpose of studying and learning - misuse is strictly forbidden.

1) The Declaration of Independence proclaimed the independence of the thirteen American colonies from the British rule. For the drafting of this document, a committee was set up by the Second Continental Congress consisting of the delegates from the colonies. This committee consisted of several important leaders such as Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, Roger Sherman and Robert Livingston.   On July 4, 1776 the Declaration of Independence was adopted by the Second Congressional Committee and forwarded to the British King.
This document written mainly by Thomas Jefferson, holds great significance, as it laid down two main principles: “unalienable rights of life liberty and pursuit of happiness,” as well as “consent of the governed”. Thus, it has contributed to the development of democratic principles not only in America but also worldwide.
First Amendment
2) The First Amendment to the United States Constitution ensures the freedom of speech to the citizens and restricts the government’s ability to constrain the freedom of speech or of the press. The court has identified three categories: First, speech that is, expression of thoughts and opinions in front of a voluntary audience; Second, Speech plus which involves actions, such as demonstrations and protests. These are protected as long as they do not endanger public safety or cause traffic disruption; And finally, the Symbolic speech, technically no speech is involved, but involves actions such as wearing black arm...

This is only a preview of the solution. Please use the purchase button to see the entire solution

Related Homework Solutions

Get help from a qualified tutor
Live Chats